Saturday, October 18, 2008

Ancestry.com - German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871

It is searchable and much like searching for a passenger on a ship. It is a long process. Now that I have logged out of ancestry this no longer shows. I will have to scan a copy of one I find. But it is good to know that this source is there.

Ancestry.com - German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871

You are here: Search > Military Records > German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871
German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871
Deutsche Verluste im Deutsch-Französischen Krieg, 1870-1871
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These records are in German
For best results, you should search using German.
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Source Information:
Ancestry.com. German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2008. Original data: Königliche Geheime Oberhofbuchdruckerei (Hrsg.). Deutsch-französischer Krieg, 1870-71, Verlust-Liste. Berlin: 1870-1871. Gebundene Zusammenfassung der fast täglich während des Krieges herausgegebenen Verlustlisten. Spezialbibliothek des Niedersächsischen Landesvereins für Familienkunde e.V., M 0054.
About German Casualties in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870-1871
This database contains 248 lists of German army officers and soldiers who either died, were injured, or went missing during the Franco-Prussian War. These lists were published in Berlin on a nearly daily basis during the war. They were later compiled into a single volume and represent nearly a complete record of German casualties from this war.

The Franco-Prussian War (July 19, 1870-May 10, 1971) was a war between France and Prussia, Prussia being supported by the German Confederation and other German states. The war resulted in the unification of the German Empire, the diminishment of French influence throughout Europe, and the territory of Alsace-Lorraine becoming part of Prussia.

This database contains 248 lists of German army officers and soldiers who either died, were injured, or went missing during the Franco-Prussian War. These lists were published in Berlin on a nearly daily basis during the war. They were later compiled into a single volume and represent nearly a complete record of German casualties from this war.

Information provided in the lists about the soldiers and officers may include:

* Name

* Rank

* Regiment and company

* Information about the death, injury, or missing status

* Place of origin

* Battles fought in

* Other details about the person’s circumstances and situation in becoming a casualty

The same person may be mentioned in multiple lists if their status changed or more information about them was later found out.

Use of the data and images in this online database is governed by the terms and conditions of this site. Any use of these records not specifically permitted in the terms and conditions requires the permission of the Niedersachsen State Family History Society, Hannover
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Please choose a range of casualty list numbers:
To browse the casualty list information, click on a range below.
Subsequent screens will allow you to select a casualty list number
Einleitung
Verlustliste Nr 001-009
Verlustliste Nr 010-019
Verlustliste Nr 020-029
Verlustliste Nr 030-039
Verlustliste Nr 040-049
Verlustliste Nr 050-059
Verlustliste Nr 060-069
Verlustliste Nr 070-079
Verlustliste Nr 080-089
Verlustliste Nr 090-099
Verlustliste Nr 100-109
Verlustliste Nr 110-119
Verlustliste Nr 120-129
Verlustliste Nr 130-139
Verlustliste Nr 140-149
Verlustliste Nr 150-159
Verlustliste Nr 160-169
Verlustliste Nr 170-179
Verlustliste Nr 180-189
Verlustliste Nr 190-199
Verlustliste Nr 200-209
Verlustliste Nr 210-219
Verlustliste Nr 220-229
Verlustliste Nr 230-239
Verlustliste Nr 240-248


I did know Juergen Hch. Wilhelm Meyer's military standing. I have to find the paper in my boxes. However, some of it has been remembered. But not exactly and it is frustrating for me at the moment. About four years ago, I asked about it online several times, I still have failed to run into that again. So, I will have to find the original source.

Wilhelm was taken prisoner and held at Metz France at Christmas 1870. He had typhoid fever or probably typhus and lived, which was not always the case, when one had typhus fever in those days. If your helping me look the word you might look for is the word for typhus. Flecktyphus

So far what I remember is that he was either fifth or sixth captain of fifth or sixth company. The infantier regiment was in the hundreds. Like maybe 136, 137 or 138 or 126, 127 or 128. Something close to that. So I will be frustrated awhile or I will just keep looking under all the Wilhelm Meyer names I am given, when I search.

It takes a lot of time and patience.
Do I have that?
just me jo

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